Jammin’… Peach Punch and Nectarine

“We’re jammin, jammin’

I hope you like jammin’ too…”

Bob Marley

It’s that season again. Dripping ice creams, long hot nights, sneaky midday siestas, mangoes and jammin’.

Yes, it’s summer…although summer got confused this week and has brought out scarves, and minestrone. I don’t mind though, I can roll with the punches, especially if the punches involve a little Peach Punch Jam. Summer might be confused in Sydney, but elsewhere it’s still producing delicious stone fruit and this time of year it’s all about the stone fruit.

What better way to hold onto those summer tastes than to pop them in a jar and eat them through out the rest of the year.Β Clearly Bob Marley was a keen preserver of the seasons going by the lyrics of his song.

These make a really easy gift for someone, for Christmas time, birthday time… any old time. It’s seasonal, you can use locally grown fruit, recycle some glass jars, and it’s an inexpensive gift to give that tastes a bucket load better than any supermarket stuff.

Peach Punch Jam

2 kg peaches

1 litre water

2 kg sugar

juice of 2 lemons

approximately 80mls dark rum
I roughly skin and chop the fruit. Weigh it, generally fruit equals sugar amount. Then cooking the fruit up with the water, and gently with a hand held mixer blitz any big lumps. If you don’t have one of these, simply cut the fruit a little finer, (or enjoy your lumps.) Slowly add sugar and lemon juice.Cooking at a rolling boil, until cold saucer test stage. Add the rum once the jam has started to gel. In to sterilised jars and store.
*******

Nectarine Jam

2 kg nectarines

1 litre of water

2 kg sugar

juice of 3 lemons

Same method as above, without the rum.

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49 thoughts on “Jammin’… Peach Punch and Nectarine

  1. I sometimes get delightful visions of your kitchen at home, and today is definitely one of those days πŸ™‚ The aroma, the taste testing, the sticky packing up…it makes a delightful scene in my mind, even if my imaginings are a tad off accurate! I love these flavour ideas too, they’re both new concepts to me as jam options.

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  2. It looks beautiful. Any reason there is no rum with the nectarines? Do they have less pectin? Also, do you take the skin off when chopping or scoop it out during cooking?

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    • No reason for the nectarines to be rum-less, just thought it would go a bit better with the peaches.
      Thanks for the skin question too- I had forgotten to write that (now edited.) For the peaches I skinned them beforehand. The nectarine jam no, though any obvious skins that rise to the top I do scoop out.

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  3. Wow, you’ve been busy, busy! Two x 2kg batches of fruit equals a LOT of jam! I’ve been jammin today too…raspberries..but just under a kilo though. I’d love to try a nice boozy apricot jam soon though..just waiting for the prices to come down to my liking. A litre of water sounds like a lot…did it take long to reach setting point? Jams are so pretty held up to the light..especially your jams!

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    • It’s been cooler weather here the past week (like a balmy winter!) so it seemed a good time for jammin’…plus the fruit was available.
      The litre does sound a lot doesn’t it, it could easily be lessened for a quicker cook, (although it didn’t look so much when it all went in). Maybe an hour it took to set??

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  4. Beautiful looking jars of jam … love the Bob Marely reference haha. Oh, I’m so envious that you’re enjoying stone fruit season … peaches are my favourite and I haven’t eaten one in many years.

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  5. Label scrubber here. Have discovered that if you soak them in cold water they come off easier, hot water seems to set the glue. Having said that, some labels are put on with airplane glue I am convinced of it. Turn your lights down low…. Jam on !

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  6. Ha ha! I had a jammin’ (We’re Jammin’) session and post in July…our summer…as well! You can’t beat homemade jams for gifts and I especially like the look of your peach punch jam with the rum in it…will have to try it next peach season here…in the N. Hemisphere! Pretty jars, too.

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  7. How inspiring. Its been ages since I have had a chance to log on to your blog and to discover so much. Lots of stuff to fill our tummies, and your full tummy. Congratulations on the tummies and the blog! Kate from Brisbane.

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  8. I’ve been doing some ‘bottling’ of my own today. Roasted capsicum sauce has become a firm favourite in this house; I hope Christmas receivers feel the same way. If I was a recipient of one of your glorious jam jars I’d be delighted! You’re much more generous than I am. I’m giving away 125ml jars and no bigger than 190mls. I do have trouble with placing nice little labels on the smaller jars. Your brown paper and raffia tie is a wonderful idea and merely write the name of the product on the paper. Might try that one next time – and next time will be very shortly. Isn’t this weather marvellous for preserving – makes me want to be in the kitchen. I swear, if you lived in my street Brydie, I’d want to start a preserve business with you. Oh, the possibilities. Have a nice day. Mariana xxx

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  9. I could not believe it when I spoke to my sister and the kids were all in long sleeves! We are also having winter days in the middle of our summer – very rude when it snows! Have a great weekend and thanks for the lovely recipes πŸ™‚

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  10. Lovely jars of jam. I’m waiting patiently for the figs to ripen in Autumn (and maybe the wildlife will leave me some this year – wretched microbats!) and I’m finally going to bottle figs in port wine again. Oh dear we aren’t allowed to call it port now….ummm fortified wine :).
    Tip for removing reluctant labels – a bottle of eucalyptus oil and some cotton balls to rub it on with. Give the label a good dab of oil, leave for about 10 mins and you should be able to peel off the label. The ‘airplane’ glue ones sometimes take 2 goes as the labels seem to be in a top and bottom layer.
    Cheers,
    Robyn

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  11. I love the name of your blog and your very fine photography (I have 40 years of amateur photography backing that up, so it’s a serious compliment!).

    I have just started a massive undertaking, a hippie movement history site, and am intrigued by your characterization of yourself. I’d love to hear about your hippie influences, where they came from, and what you think of my first few blog posts and “About” pages.

    I do intend to write on organic/local foods as one of the hippie movement’s lasting positive legacies. Any direct connections you know of between present local growers and sellers and true hippie roots might provide some useful source material if you could make an introduction.

    Love and peace, the anonymous hippie curator of Thank A Hippie!

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  12. Pingback: cherry plum and almond wreath « Cityhippyfarmgirl

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