my petite kitchen

 Bonjour mon cher, bonjour

Now not knowing more than a smattering of french words, I should probably leave it at that, but due to the fact that in recent times it seems I’ve come over all ‘frenchy‘, I will probably see if I can slip just a little more french words into this post.

And what caused all this ‘frenchness‘ I hear you ask? Actually, I’m not sure. I still have a deep love for all things Italian. I still have an imagined Scandinavian heritage, and now, well it seems there is a heady French call, (at least in my petite kitchen there is.)

cityhippyfarmgirlWhat to do with this little lovely? Chestnut spread, in a tube and brought to me from Paris. It could be absolute garbage, but not to me. (Look at all those cute little french words on there!)

cityhippyfarmgirl

 Petite fleurs, teeny tiny ones that didn’t last long on my usually quite unexciting kitchen bench cactus.

cityhippyfarmgirlGateau a la banane with passionfruit icing. Always a simple bake when there are squishy bananas to be had. I make this cake up in a mixer these days.

cityhippyfarmgirl

 Parisian flea market finds, bought and brought back for me. I was particularly excited by this one. How many kitchens has this round beauty seen… What had it been used for?

cityhippyfarmgirl

Old milk bottle finds that were sitting unloved in someones garage. I’m preparing the bottles to be loved again…or should I say amour.
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Linking in with the lovely Madame Celia and her kitchen frolics
Kisses on both cheeks to anyone who leaves comments in French this week.
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48 thoughts on “my petite kitchen

  1. Oh dear. I’m going to miss out on two kisses and just get the usual Aussie, one. I have no French except for Bonjour and Au Revoir. Hopeless! Your gateau looks lovely and I can’t wait to see what you do with the chestnut spread xx

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  2. I love this! I took French in high school and college, but fear I’m down to a similar smattering of French vocabulary. I feel as though kitchens were just meant to be Frenchy. Someday, when my kitchen is a little bigger, I think I need a poster with Julia Child quotes!

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  3. All right dearest, let’s awaken my high school French awkwardness:
    Belle article Brydie! Rédaction en français fait tout son mieux. Ne peut pas attendre de voir ce que vous faites avec la pâte de marrons. J’ai un pot à la maison aussi et je ne sais pas quoi faire avec elle. Amour! xxx

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  4. Bonjour Brydie! J’adore toutes les choses françaises aussi! Je n’ai jamais goûté à la pâte de marrons et je serais curieux de savoir ce qu’il goûte. J’espère que vous apprécierez ce que vous créez avec elle! À bientôt mon amie!

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  5. I once tried speaking french in paris and was asked to use english so I will spare you my schoolgirl french – oh ok – tres bon, tres jolie! Am curious about what you will use the flea market find for – intriguing indeed (see I am so much more articulate in english)

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  6. Too cute, all of them. How wonderful is that round copper (?) pot thingy, even better that it was from a French flea market. Did you watch The Little Paris Kitchen on SBS recently? I loved it!

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  7. The image of that tube of marron (how delightful that one of the French words for “brown” is marron! Thankyou Google Translate 😉 ) chestnut gorgeousness just caused me to exhale one of the only French words that stuck after 3 years of high school French. I didn’t even learn it from the ever patient clinically depressed Mrs Quinlivin who I swear needed respite care every school holidays in order for her to continue her career. That word was MERDE! and chestnut puree deserves a degree of French exclamation. I LOVE this stuff. My daughters gifted me an entire jar of it when they tasted it and found it wanting. I spread it on everything. I would spread it on myself if that wasn’t a bit strange. Lovely Froggie post and enjoying all of those delicious things that your wonderful friends brought back for you. You are a lucky girl indeed 🙂

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    • Narf I totally understand forced exhalation on thinking about chestnut paste. It’s darn good…sort of a nutty condensed milk?? Maybe Mrs Quinlivin would have had some spread on her morning toast with cafe au lait? Who knows…
      (Hope your daughters gift you another jar one day down the track.)

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      • I might have to drop the odd hint. I fear poor Mrs Quinlivin may never have recovered from trying to teach our class “Alouette”…we were slow learners 😉

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  8. Brydie, my French vocabulary consists of “French fries” and “French toast” 😉 — but your IMK post appealed to “moi” greatly. The history (and mystery) behind your copper-colored baking pan is a treasure, as are your milk bottles waiting to be loved again. Curious to see what you come up with for the chestnut spread!

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  9. Parisian flea market finds? You are one very lucky lady Brydie. Love the chestnut paste packaging, especially Mr Chestnut! Can’t wait to see what you make with it (I notice it has a seriously long use-by date, so I guess there’s no hurry)!
    PS. Banana gateau with passionfruit icing has my name written all over it. I’d like a slice right now thanks.

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