sweet potato leaves, it’s Frugal Friday

Sweet potato leaves have come up a few times in my Foodconnect box. At first (along with my red amaranth) I didn’t know what to do with it. A little playing though and another healthy leafy green vegetable to add to my growing list of all things good.

Now what to do with it?

It cooks up similarly to regular spinach, quickly and in a wilty kind of fashion. I used it here with potatoes, as I seem to have discovered there are good potatoes to be had in this world. Who knew!

In my trusty flat bottomed wok, (or use any old pot).

I added 2 good slurps of olive oil

an onion and diced garlic

pop in some already cooked chopped potatoes

give it a one two

add some sliced capsicum (peppers)

and the plucked whole sweet potato leaves

wilt it all on down for a minute or two

serve and drizzle with a little extra olive oil and a squeeze of lemon.

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39 thoughts on “sweet potato leaves, it’s Frugal Friday

  1. It is still Thursday here, but it sounds good anyway. I have never seen sweet potato leaves, but I will certainly be looking now. I have not seen sweet potatoes here at all come to think if it.

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  2. i never knew you could eat the sweet potato leaves! i mean of course you can (hehe), but it’s always good to see a fellow ‘hippie city farm girl’ do something exotic! well maybe not exotic, but different! i once thought celery leaves and dandelion tea was weird.. well how the times have changed. have a happy thursday and keep up with the wonderful blog! lauren πŸ™‚

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  3. Well., there you go. I didn’t know about Sweet Potato leaves…., it looks pretty darn good though. Gotta love the wok huh.
    PS: Your beer is on the way girl – hope you enjoy it πŸ™‚

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  4. I imagine you could eat the leaves of most root vegetables. I figure if you can eat turnip greens and beet greens, sweet potato would be almost mild in comparison.
    Your finished dish looks marvelous- I would love to have a big dish of it!
    I have difficulty convincing my husband to eat kale and spinach- he just isn’t into greens, So my son and I eat all the “good” veggies.

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    • Heidi you’re probably right about the eating most root vegetables, and it is quite mild in taste.
      Your husband doesn’t do green? My Monkeys take a little convincing too. More for you and your son I say!

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  5. I’ve never cooked with sweet potato leaves – I would love to try sometime! Looks like you have some gorgeous, waxy potatoes just perfect for playing with there πŸ™‚

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  6. Well that’s really interesting, I didn’t know you could eat sweet potatoes leaves. Not, of course, that we get many of those to eat over here anyway, but well worth knowing. This sounds good. I do something similar with nettle tops.

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  7. Can I join in? I’ve never even seen sweet potato leaves, so they must be different completely from regular potato leaves which are poisonous aren’t they? I would love to have a plateful to try. They sound wonderful. Last winter we became obsessed with brussel sprout tops, which I didn’t know you could eat either. X Joanna

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    • I’m not sure I’ve even seen brussel sprouts growing Joanna. So I’ll swap you a plate of sweet potato leaves for a plate of brussel sprout tops.
      I think the potato leaves could be poisonous Joanna, but no idea on the particulars.

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      • They are a completely different plant to potatoes which I think are poisonous (the leaves anyway). And yes sprout tops are good, though never grown them myself.

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  8. I’m definately giving this a go this week. I’d heard that you could eat sweet potato leaves, but had forgotten. Thanks for refressinging my memory and for providing some cooking inspiration.

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  9. These are a favourite of Chinese Malaysian cooking… though it is said that to pluck the leaves for eating (which it is quite a few), some of the would-be-potatoes are sacrificed…. >.<

    Nice blog btw! Keep up the fab work πŸ™‚

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  10. I’ve just seen sweet potato leaves used as a excellent base for mullet in lardo, (also super cheap) cooked at Sydney Seafood School. I was researching where to get them in Sydney and, lo and behold, found your blog popping up. You’re no help at all on the ‘where to get them’ quest, but you’ve done a great job with the recipe and pics! Thanks!!

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    • Now I might just be able to help you Mr Tulloch. If you go to the very small farmers market at Taylor Square on a Saturday morning, and head to Rita’s produce stand (closest veg stand to bondi direction), she might just have some or be able to get you some for the following week.
      Mullet in lardo with sweet potato leaves sounds like an inspired dish… good luck in your leafy quest!

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